Entropy MAB2012

Oct 03

Final note: The Cycle Shift Media Facade


The Concept

There is a problem in the cultural fabric of Sydney. Bicycles are simply not seen as credible forms of transport, and this creates an air of danger and intimidation when cycling in Sydney. This requires action; a behavioural change; a paradigm shift in attitudes.

The Cycle Shift Media Facade is a playful media facade that increases the visibility of cyclists in Sydney by multiplying the current bike movements in the city. By simply increasing visibility, we aim to bring about the much-needed cultural shift in Sydneysider attitudes towards bike culture on the roads. We determined from the document and our user research that in order to create a gradual cultural shift that accepted adopted cyclists, one must introduce more cyclists to roads (Cycle Strategy and Action Plan, 2.11).

Cyclists in Sydney can contribute by utilising the GPS data from their mobile phones or other devices. This information gets routed to our media facade, situated in the high density citizen thoroughfare of Central tunnel. This information turns into a visual multiplicity of cycle activity in Sydney — bicycles whizz past commuters in an artistic representation and multiplication of the current state of bicycles in transit. Bicycle awareness becomes apart of the cultural fabric of Sydneysiders. The commuters can also interact with the facade: on the opposite side of the
representation of Sydney cycle activity, a silhouette of a bike serendipitously follows each commuter on their daily walk, further connecting the public to cycle culture and engaging them in a playful conversation through the once-mundane tunnel transfer.


Design Process

After defining the brief and conducting initial research and moodboarding, we set out our design process with the use of some low-fi-cardsorting. Following this we grabbed lunch, a few beers, whilst we locked down our problem domain through the definition and discusion of civic themes and challenges, wanting to make sure we addressed a civic challenge specially targeted to our locality. We conducted user interviews, summarised them and evaluated the state of cycling in Sydney, along with it’s action plan. Following this was intensive research, conceptual brainstorming, and synthesis of our idea. Finally we storyboarded and filmed the video and wrote our final concept.


Research References
http://sydneycycleways.net/the-network/strategy-research/cycle-strategy-action-plan-2007-2017
Cycle Strategy And Action Plan 2007-2017.pdf
Electric bikes part of the Sydney Australia Sustainable Transport Plan
http://denmark.dk/en/green-living/bicycle-culture/
http://www.business.nsw.gov.au/invest-in-nsw/about-nsw/people-skills-and-education/population-estimates
http://denmark.dk/en/green-living/bicycle-culture/copenhageners-love-their-bikes/
http://www.bicyclenetwork.com.au/media/vanilla/file/NCP2011_NSW.pdf


The Video
https://dl.dropbox.com/u/19696195/TheCycleShift.mov

A Clarifying Post

Just a clarifying post on our location as I don’t believe we’ve mentioned this.

Our location: Central Tunnel


Characteristics:

What we’re going to design for

After discussing our four potential categories (mapping, data collection, education, promotion), across the user categories, we decided to focus on Promotion.

Especially, we wanted to facilitate the catalystic goal of creating recreational cyclists.
We determined from the document and our user research that in order to create a gradual cultural shift that accepted adopted cyclists, one must introduce more cyclists to roads (Cycle Strategy and Action Plan, 2.11). To do this, more commuter cyclists must be promoted, who are naturally evolved from recreational cyclists. Through this chain, recreational cyclists are the basis of this cultural shift. They themselves are derived from noncyclists, and are whom we intend to target.

Intensive research, conceptual brainstorming, synthesis into a solution

Hanley explaining his intensive research into Sydney’s Cycle Strategy & Action Plan: 2007 - 2017.

Detailed analysis of the strategy, looking at specific aims, targets, and appendix’s of the sub-action plans.

Ideas are forming!

Concepts and research, synthesising!

S Y N T H E S I S

Concept locked down!

Sydney’s City Action Plan

The City of Sydney Cycle Strategy and Action Plan (2007-2017) is a plan made to make cycling a more attractive form of transport.

Here is a snapshot of the specific aims and targets of the plan (as outlined on their site):


Here are some key points from the document:

The document greatly supports our own findings from our research and user interviews.

The action plan was additionally divided into a:

From this, we gleaned four categories of focus:

Additional bicycle user categories were also outlined, these were children, local cyclists, commuters, adult student cyclists, recreational cyclists, sport cyclists, tourist cyclists, bicycle couriers, and bicycle non-users.

References
http://sydneycycleways.net/the-network/strategy-research/cycle-strategy-action-plan-2007-2017
Cycle Strategy And Action Plan 2007-2017.pdf

The state of cycling in Sydney

Here are some comparative maps of bike maps between Sydney and other cities.

Melbourne vs Sydney


Aarhus vs Sydney

Amsterdam vs Sydney

Helsinki vs Sydney

Copenhagen vs Sydney

In terms of New South Wales vs Copenhagen, approximately 1.05 million people in NSW ride a bicycle each week. That is a large amount of people, however only 67% of the people who do ride, only ride for recreational purposes and only 13% ride for commuting. When comparing this to the city of Copenhagen, a massive 50% of the entire population ride bicycles to commute to work/study.

Additionally, in parts of Australia, the transport sector can make up to 25% of our greenhouse gas emissions.

Some quotes from our user interviews:

This is a diagram of the current and proposed bike network of Sydney by the year 2030.

For reference, this is a google map view of the same area of Sydney

The City of Sydney provides a better diagram comparing the current and proposed networks.

The City of Sydney also provides diagrams of High difficulty roads, or prohibited roads:

References
Cycle Strategy And Action Plan 2007-2017.pdf
Electric bikes part of the Sydney Australia Sustainable Transport Plan
http://denmark.dk/en/green-living/bicycle-culture/
http://www.business.nsw.gov.au/invest-in-nsw/about-nsw/people-skills-and-education/population-estimates
http://denmark.dk/en/green-living/bicycle-culture/copenhageners-love-their-bikes/
http://www.bicyclenetwork.com.au/media/vanilla/file/NCP2011_NSW.pdf

Summary of interview findings (the summary of summaries!)

Oct 02

[video]

User Interviews (NOW with interview summaries!)

First User Interview: Rick from Cheeky Transport

Rick

User Interview 2: Ingrid, a visiting PhD candidate from Austria. Originally from Italy.

Ingrid’s bike!


User Interview 3: Christian, who has ridden bicycles extensively in Holland, Netherlands. Rides to University every day from his home.

Christian

Impromptu group discussion

The data and the reward!

Problem-domain refinement

After contemplating upon localized civil themes and challenges over lunch we narrowed down our choices to: